Our Favourite Things | Five Centuries: Furniture, Paintings & Works of Art

Our Favourite Things | Five Centuries: Furniture, Paintings & Works of Art

September 2019

Our specialists have selected a few of their favourite things to highlight some of the exceptional pieces in this Wednesday's Five Centuries: Furniture, Paintings & Works of Art from 1600 auction taking place in Edinburgh. 

This September's Five Centuries auction features excellent examples of British and Continental furniture, paintings and works of art, including specialist collecting areas encompassing clocks, bronzes, ceramics & glass, rugs & carpets. Our specialists have chosen a few of their favourite things to share as highlights in our Wednesday 4 September auction...


 

LOT 35 | GEORGE III MAHOGANY HOUR REPEATING BRACKET CLOCK, HARRY POTTER, LONDON

LOT 35 | GEORGE III MAHOGANY HOUR REPEATING BRACKET CLOCK, HARRY POTTER, LONDON | LATE 18TH CENTURY
52cm high (handle up), 28cm wide, 19cm deep | £2,000 - £3,000 + fees

 

The Potter family of clock and watchmakers were well-known in the 18th and early 19th centuries in London. There were two Harry (Henry) Potters, Senior and Junior, operating at the end of the 18th century. Harry Potter (Junior), was apprenticed to William Creak in 1761 worked from No. 5 west St Aldersgate in 1785 and was made a Master of the Clockmaker's Company in 1795 and 1812. He died in office in 1813.


I like this clock not just because it’s such a handsome example of 18th century English clockmaking, but also because I can’t help but think how amused Harry Potter, the London clockmaker, would be to know that his name has become famous the world over due to sharing it with a fictional boy wizard two centuries later.

-Douglas Girton, Head of Sale

VIEW LOT 35 ONLINE ⇒


 

LOT 152 | LARGE DUTCH WHEEL-ENGRAVED ARMORIAL GLASS GOBLET


LOT 152 | LARGE DUTCH WHEEL-ENGRAVED ARMORIAL GLASS GOBLET | MID 18TH CENTURY | 22.5cm high | £1,000 - £1,500 + fees

 

The armorial bearings are the lesser or abbreviated Royal Arms of the Kingdom of Spain. These arms probably refer to King Charles III of Spain (1716 -1788). He was the fifth son of King Philip V of Spain, and the eldest son of Philip's second wife, Elisabeth Farnese. Upon the death of his granduncle Antonio Farnese in 1731, Charles became Charles I, Duke of Parma and Piacenza. He married Princess Maria Amalia of Saxony (1724-1760) in 1738, the daughter of King Augustus III of Poland and his wife, Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria. During their marriage Charles and Maria had thirteen children, eight of whom survived into adulthood. He ascended to the Spanish throne in 1759 upon the death of his half-brother, King Ferdinand IV.

Not only is this a beautifully shaped glass of great size, the engravings reveal a lot about the political history of the time: You can see the the lesser or abbreviated Royal Arms of the Kingdom of Spain. That this can be found on a Dutch glass gives us some pointers towards the relationship between the two countries in mid-18th century, the time this glass was made. The Dutch at the time were the most sought-after glass makers and especially glass engravers, and this lot is a great example of their mastery.

-Theodora Burrell, Specialist, Ceramics & Glass

VIEW LOT 152 ONLINE ⇒ 


 

LOT 19 | REGENCY 'LOVERS' KNOT' PUZZLE PURSE

 

LOT 19 | Y REGENCY 'LOVERS' KNOT' PUZZLE PURSE | EARLY 19TH CENTURY | 33cm x 30cm | £200 - £300 + fees

 

I find this Regency Lover’s Knot incredibly sweet with it’s beautifully worked out design and careful calligraphy. The fact that it was never folded as it should have been makes me imagine the anonymous person who made it couldn’t bear to see their work creased and folded after they were finished, so had it framed instead. I’d gladly have it hanging on my wall today!

-Douglas Girton, Head of Sale

VIEW LOT 19 ONLINE ⇒


 

LOT 464 | CONTINENTAL CARVED BONE HOURGLASS

 

LOT 464 | CONTINENTAL CARVED BONE HOURGLASS | LATE 18TH CENTURY / EARLY 19TH CENTURY | 22.5cm high | £800 - £1,200 + fees


The hourglass, as it makes the passing of time visible in trickling sand, often serves as a symbol for life and death. This fact, combined with this one being beautifully carved from bone, makes it a subtle Memento Mori. I think this dark symbolism makes it a really fascinating item, and so, a simple implement to measure time can teach us quite a bit about the way of thinking in the society at the end of the 17th century

- Kerstin Schaeffer, Sale Administrator

VIEW LOT 464 ONLINE ⇒


 

LOT 309 | REGENCY MAHOGANY DAVENPORT, BY GILLOWS

 

LOT 309 | REGENCY MAHOGANY DAVENPORT, BY GILLOWS | EARLY 19TH CENTURY | 56cm wide, 85cm high, 60cm deep | £1,800 - £2,200 + fees


This beautifully made Davenport by Gillows of Lancaster is my furniture pick. Davenports have fallen out of fashion in recent years, but when you see one made by one of the top makers, you can’t help but wonder why? The craftsmanship and precision are top-notch, and I love all the neatly designed drawers, slides and trays that all fit together in such a compact form. It’s time for the Davenport to have a comeback!

-Douglas Girton, Head of Sale

VIEW LOT 309 ONLINE ⇒


 

Dates for Your Diary

 

AUCTION | Five Centuries: Furniture, Paintings & Works of Art from 1600 | Wednesday 4th September at 10am

VIEWING | Saturday 31st August & Sunday 1st September 12pm-4pm | Monday 2nd & Tuesday 3rd September 10am-5pm | Morning of the sale from 9am

LOCATION | 33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh

 

VIEW THE FULL AUCTION CATALOGUE  ➤

 

 

Recent Articles