The newly discovered paintings shown in our "Bright Souls" exhibition from Monday 24th June to Saturday 6th July date from the 17th Century, and are exceptionally rare works by Joan Carlile, Mary Beale and Anne Killigrew, the first British women to make their name as artists. With works loaned from both museums and private collections, "Bright Souls" is the first exhibition ever devoted to Britain’s pioneering female artists, and includes self-portraits of all three artists.
 


Joan Carlile, Portrait of a Lady                                                                      

A full-length portrait by Joan Carlile, the first female British professional painter. Like many works by female artists, it had been wrongly attributed to a male artist. It was discovered in the staircase of Mellerstain House in Scotland. It was painted in the 1650s, when Carlile opened a studio in Covent Garden in London.

 

Joan Carlile, Portrait of a Lady, 1650s, oil on canvas, 120x93 cm, kindly lent by the Mellerstain Trust, Mellerstain House, Scotland. 


Mary Beale, Portrait of a Gentleman, possibly Samuel Woodforde (1636-1700)                                                                                                                                                                                                         

A previously unknown portrait by Mary Beale, the most successful female British artist of the 17th Century. The sitter is thought to be Beale’s friend and cousin, the poet Samuel Woodforde. It was painted in the 1660s when Beale created a series of ‘friendship portraits’, bringing a hitherto unknown degree of sensitivity to British portraiture. But the attribution to Beale was lost, and it was more recently thought to be by the court artist Sir Peter Lely.

 

Mary Beale, Portrait of a Gentleman, possibly Samuel Woodforde (1636-1700), early 1660s, oil on canvas, 76.2x63.5 cm, Private Collection, Scotland.


Anne Killigrew, Portrait of a Lady, probably the artist                                                                        

A rare portrait by Anne Killigrew, the first British artist to successfully combine the ‘sister arts’ of painting and poetry. Although Killigrew is known to have painted over a dozen works, only three are known today. The newly identified painting would represent a fourth, and was identified last year in a minor Italian auction. Painted in the 1680s, shortly before she died of smallpox in 1685, it probably shows the artist herself, in a highly detailed allegorical setting. 

 

Anne Killigrew, Portrait of a Lady, probably the artist, oil on canvas, 46.5x36.5cm, Private Collection, Scotland.

 


                                                                                                                                                                                       
EXHIBITION


“Bright Souls”: The Forgotten Story of Britain’s First Female Artists 
An exhibition presenting the lost art and forgotten story of Britain’s pioneering female painters. 
 
Monday 24th June to Saturday 6th July 2019  
Weekdays 10.30am to 5pm | Saturday 12 noon to 4pm 
 
Lyon & Turnbull, 22 Connaught Street, London, W2 2AF  
0207 930 9115 | london@lyonandturnbull.com