Lyon & Turnbull

The Meiji Period | A Unique Blending of Traditional Design and International Taste

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The late 19th century brought extensive change to Japan as it transformed itself from an isolated feudal nation into its modern form. Fundamental changes affected the country's social structure, economy, military, foreign relations and, of course, the arts.  This period of flux is known as the Meiji Period, after the Meiji Emperor who held the throne from 1868 until his death in 1912. 

During this period Japan’s new leaders realised that the historic skills of the metalworker, lacquerer, enameller and ceramic artist could play a vital part in the struggle to compete in international markets and before long, visitors to international exhibitions in Europe and America were presented with astonishing displays of Japanese artistic creativity and technical virtuosity.

The unique blending of traditional design and international taste that defines Meiji art produced pieces remarkable in the quality of their craftsmanship that have been avidly sought by Western collectors since.  Collectable categories include miniatures like netsuke and inro, metalwares, bronze sculptures, armour, swords and sword fittings such as tsuba.

Our upcoming September Asian Art auction includes a wonderful selection of Meiji period pieces - perfect for the seasoned collector or one just starting out.  


Netsuke

Netsuke (pronounced net-ski) go hand in hand with inro, the small compartmentalised boxes used to carry medicines.  Inro were hung by a cord from the wearer's belt, the cord tightened by the ojime, or bead, and held in place by the netsuke, acting as a toggle slipped through the belt to hold it in place.  First made in the 17th century they continued until the Meiji period when western dress was introduced to Japan.  Always full of character and charm these beautifully carved items have been widely collected in the West since the late 19th century.  

netsuke pug

Lot 246
CARVED WOOD NETSUKE OF A PUG 
SIGNED TOYOMASA, MEIJI PERIOD
 
3.4cm high 
£300-500 + fees 

netsuke boy

Lot 247
CARVED WOOD KARAKURI-NETSUKE OF A BOY 
MEIJI PERIOD 

4cm high 
£500-800 + fees 


Metalwares and Enamels

Japanese silver elephant

Lot 303A
FINE SILVER MODEL OF AN ELEPHANT 
SIGNED KOREYOSHI, MEIJI/TAISHO PERIOD 

naturalistically modelled in striding pose, the trunk curved downward, the wrinkles of the skin finely detailed, the underside with a square cartouche with gilt seal of Koreyoshi 
£2,000-3,000 + fees 

Lot 317
FINE MIDNIGHT BLUE GROUND HEXAGONAL CLOISONNÉ ENAMEL VASE 
STYLE OF HAYASHI KODENJI (1831-1915), MEIJI PERIOD 

of hexagonal section, worked in silver wire and various coloured cloisonné enamels on a dark blue ground with two birds, one in flight and the other perched on flowering cherry branches, the neck and foot with foliate lappets, the mouth and foot with silver mount 
19cm high 
£250-350 + fees 

Lot 310
SILVER AND CLOISONNÉ ENAMEL 'MILLEFLEUR' CENSER AND COVER 
MEIJI PERIOD 

finely embossed with a profusion of flowers, raised on four splayed legs issuing from lion-masks and terminating in paw feet, the shoulder set with two elephant handles suspending loose rings, the pierced cover with a lotus pod finial surrounded by four cloisonné enamelled butterflies 
18cm high, 557g 
£5,000-8,000 + fees


Sword Fittings - Tsuba

The tsuba is the guard at the end of the grip of bladed Japanese weapons. It contributed to the balance of the weapon and to the protection of the hand. The tsuba was mostly meant to be used to prevent the hand from sliding onto the blade during thrusts as opposed to protecting from an opponent's blade. During the peaceful Meiji period (1868-1912) tsuba became more ornamental - finely decorated and made of less practical precious metals - and thus collector's items or heirlooms.  


Lot 290
CLOISONNÉ ENAMEL TSUBA 
EDO/MEIJI PERIOD 

in aoi-gata (hollyhock leaf) shape, finely enamelled with flowers in various shades of blue and red amongst scrolling tendrils and loose petals 
8.5cm high 
£800-1,200 + fees

Lot 293
INLAID COPPER TSUBA 
MEIJI PERIOD 

in the form of a jar, inlaid in gold and shakudo with the figure of a Shojo, signed 
7.6cm high 
£1,500-2,000 + fees


Date for Your Diary

Asian Art Auction | 13 September at 11am

33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh, EH1 3RR

Viewing from Sunday 10 Setpember from 12noon

View the Full Catalogue

Contact


Ling Zhu
Specialist

0131 557 8844

Email

Published: 5 September 2017

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