The  Roman  historian  and  philosopher,  Nicholas  of  Damascus,  wrote  his  work On  Plants  (occasionally  attributed  to  Aristotle)  in  the  first  century  BCE.  In  China,  the  Shennong  Bencao  Jing  (The  Great  Herbal)  is  believed  to  have  been  written  around  4700  years  ago,  with  the  oldest  surviving  copy  of  the  work  dating  from  c.500  CE.  As  with  many  texts,  ancient  herbals  were  copied  and  translated  into  Arabic,  preserved  by  Muslim  scholars  and  'rediscovered'  during  the  European  Renaissance.  Arber  writes,  in  her  important  1912  guide  to  the  history  of  Herbals: " ͞The  Arabic  translations  of  classical  writings  were  eventually  rendered  into  Latin,  or  even  sometimes  into  Greek  again,  and  in  this  guise  found  their  way  to  western  Europe."

LOT 227 | MATTIOLI, PIETRO ANDREA | COMMENTARII IN SEX LIBROS | VENICE: VINCENZO VALGRISI, 1565 | £4,000-6,000 + fees

In  the  grand  history  of  herbals,  therefore,  Andrea  Mattioli's  Commentarii  in  Sex  Libros,  first  published  in  1544,  is  a  relatively  modern  production  –  yet  it  came  into  being  a  mere  100  years  following  the  invention  of  Gutenberg's  printing  press.  The  copy  to  be  offered  by  Lyon  &  Turnbull  in  October  2018  was  produced  21  years  later,  in  1565,  and  includes  an  impressive  array  of  beautifully  produced  woodcuts.  These  illustrations,  along  with  the  sheer  size  of  the  book,  have  led  this  edition  of  the  work  to  be  termed  the  'preferred  edition'.1  Mattioli  has  illustrated  both  plants  and  animals,  including  a  cactus  and  frolicking  hares.  In  its  early  years  of  publication,  up  to  the  1560s,  32,000  copies  of  Mattioli's  Commentarii  in  Sex  Libros  are  thought  to  have  been  sold.

The  author  of  the  work  was  born  in  Sienna  in  1501,  became  the  physician  to  both  Archduke  Ferdinand  and  Emperor  Maximillian  II  and,  as  befell  many  of  his  contemporaries,  succumbed  to  the  plague  at  the  ripe  old  age  of  76.  Arber  points  out  that  many  of  the  authors  of  herbals  were  medical  practitioners,  perhaps  bringing  them  all  the  more  often  into  contact  with  plague  sufferers.  Mattioli's  chef  d'oeuvre  contains  a  detailed  explanation  of  the  theories  of  the  Greek  physician  Dioscorides  and  a  full  inventory  of  all  the  plants  Mattioli  had  encountered,  including  several  he  first  recorded  himself,  discovered  in  Tirol.

The  author  of  the  work  was  born  in  Sienna  in  1501,  became  the  physician  to  both  Archduke  Ferdinand  and  Emperor  Maximillian  II  and,  as  befell  many  of  his  contemporaries,  succumbed  to  the  plague  at  the  ripe  old  age  of  76.  Arber  points  out  that  many  of  the  authors  of  herbals  were  medical  practitioners,  perhaps  bringing  them  all  the  more  often  into  contact  with  plague  sufferers.  Mattioli's  chef  d'oeuvre  contains  a  detailed  explanation  of  the  theories  of  the  Greek  physician  Dioscorides  and  a  full  inventory  of  all  the  plants  Mattioli  had  encountered,  including  several  he  first  recorded  himself,  discovered  in  Tirol.

The  original  aim  of  the  work  was  to  better  acquaint  contemporary  physicians  with  the  medical  herbs  and  plants  described  by  Dioscorides.2  The  number  of  copies  produced  shows  that  this  was  an  extremely  popular  publication,  although  the  man  who  is  often  credited  with  producing  Renaissance  Italy's  best  loved  herbal  is  considered  to  have  been  somewhat  unpleasant.  Arber  writes: "He engaged  in  numerous  controversies  with  his  fellow  botanists  and  hurled  the  most  abusive  language  at  those  who  ventured  to  criticise  him."

LOT 227 | MATTIOLI, PIETRO ANDREA | COMMENTARII IN SEX LIBROS | VENICE: VINCENZO VALGRISI, 1565 | £4,000-6,000 + fees

It  is  easy  to  see  why  Mattioli's  work  has  endured  in  popularity,  and  can  now  fetch  very  high  prices  at  auction.  The  woodcuts  by  various  artists  are  endearing  and  full  of  character.  One  image  shows  insects  swarming  across  a  bed,  whilst  surprised  fish  and  chubby  exotic  plants  feature  elsewhere.  The  copy  to  be  offered  in  October,  with  its  contemporary  vellum  binding,  is  a  fine  example  of  one  of  history's  best  known  works  on  plants.


Notes

1 Brunet III  
2 DSB IX, p.179   

MATTIOLI, PIETRO ANDREA | COMMENTARII IN SEX LIBROS

LOT 227 | MATTIOLI, PIETRO ANDREA | COMMENTARII IN SEX LIBROS | VENICE: VINCENZO VALGRISI, 1565 | £4,000-6,000 + fees

 

VIEW LOT 227 ONLINE

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              


 

Dates for your Diary

 

VIEWING | Sun 30th September, 12 noon to 4pm | Mon 1st October, 10.00am to 5pm | Morning of sale 9am to 11am

AUCTION | Rare Books, Manuscripts, Maps & Photographs | 2nd October 2018 | 11am in Edinburgh

LOCATION | 33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh, EH1 3RR 

BROWSE THE FULL CATALOGUE